Saturday, April 25, 2015

TOUR OF MY STUDIO



Come tour my studio and see my works in progress....
Posted by Diana Cobb Ansley on Sunday, February 1, 2015

Friday, April 24, 2015

NEW PAINTING KATAHDIN AND THE LAST MILES OF THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL OIL ON LINEN 18 X 36

PLEIN AIR PAINTING KATAHDIN, BAXTER STATE PARK MAINE FALL 2014

Katahdin and the Last Miles of the Appalachian Trail
Oil on Linen 18 x 36

Last Fall Alexandra Tyng and I went painting in Baxter State Park, Maine and up the Golden Road.  I was inspired by the new book the Art of Katahdin by David Little and my nephew's recent 3rd climb to the top of Katahdin.  It is about a 10 hour climb. This view encompasses the last miles of the Appalachain Trail which ends unceremoniously in an opening in the trees on the Golden Road.  You will see thin, bearded hikers spilling onto the road.  Often there is a car with family members to greet them.  Their hike is not quite done as they then must cross over and summit Katahdin to complete their journey.  



We had the most amazing trip into the wilderness!!  One morning we left at 8 am and traveled down a logging road to a clear cut with a panoramic view of the Katahdin range including North and South Turner and Double Top mountains.  It was a cool crisp morning and our Maine Guide was intent on finding us a moose! He kept hanging out the window with his moose caller. We saw moose tracks, but as our guide explained the moose were in their rutting season (mating) and were often hard to find.


Moose Tracks



The expanse of landscape was hard to comprehend with so many stands of trees, islands, and ribbons of water.  There was a pale peach hue on the horizon and mist hanging and lifting below the mountains. I felt so totally privileged to paint this magnificent scene.  The camera failed at capturing the scene as it squishes the mountains and can not see the kaleidoscope of colors across the vista.  

The View
                                                    
So Happy Painting Katahdin from the Logging Road - This is what I love about plein air painting!

Alex and I perched in our painting spots with our Maine guide
 watching over us!

Katahdin was donated to the State of Maine by Governor Percival P. Baxter.
So I leave you with Governor Baxter's words above.....


Sunday, August 3, 2014

STILL WATERS OF JORDAN POND 40 X 50 ON VIEW AT THE GALLERY OF SOMES SOUND, MOUNT DESERT

One of my favorite things about being an artist is watching my paintings develop.  I have a vision of what I want to do and a feeling I want to convey that I can’t often put into words, but am aiming toward.  I often feel my way toward the end effect.  My latest painting of Jordan Pond, Mount Desert is 40 x 50.  I love painting big and can’t wait to see where the painting will go.  I often take pictures as I go to see my progress.


 When I initially begin I need to feel how the scene will sit on the canvas.  In this painting I was looking for the monumental feeling I had at the end of Jordan Pond viewing the Bubbles.  I had Thomas Cole and Frederic Church’s views of Mount Desert in the back of my mind and wanted to show that those monumental scenes they painted on Mount Desert still exist in untouched beauty.  One would not realize the Jordan Pond House is just up the hill serving hundreds tea on the lawn every afternoon.




I usually work from the top to the bottom in laying in the scene.



Once I began the water I needed to feel my way around the space organizing the rocks and beginning to weave the rocks and water so they felt interconnected.




The entire scene is basically in, but I was still feeling my way as to whether to show all the clouds reflected in the water.  It is a delicate thing to be able to balance the scene.



My cloud reflections are in and I am working on seeing through the water.


Sometimes you need to sit with a painting and see how it feels and take the time to feel if it is complete.  It is not like someone is on my shoulder saying "you are done!!"  In this painting, it was several weeks until I felt there needed to be more clouds on the right.  It is all about adjustments.  The last bit of a painting is often when it begins to shine.  It is always a good feeling!